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Why We Went On To Have Two More Children After Having A Child With Special Needs

Last Reviewed 21/11/2017

By swan uk member, blogger and parent rep for Warwickshire, Aimee Mann

A friend asked me this weekend why we decided to have three children? There was no sarcasm or malice in the question. Just simply wondering and genuinely interested. He knows that Freddie has additional needs and wondered how we cope.

Sometimes ignorance is bliss.

When we found out at my 20 week scan that Freddie’s brain wasn’t developing correctly and after all the scans and tests that followed until his pre-term birth, our focus was just getting him here safely. We had no diagnosis, didn’t have a clue what the future would hold and had never really thought about anything genetic.

However, we had always wanted two children and I think that because we could ‘hide’ Freddie’s needs when he was a baby and pretend to ourselves that he was going to be ok, we decided to go for it pretty quickly. Living in denial was probably quite blissful at the time. I became pregnant with Bella when he was only nine months old. Perhaps if we had left it longer, we might have made different decisions? I don’t know. It was around this time that the hundreds of appointments and therapy sessions really kicked in. I was one exhausted pregnant lady. We got through it though and were so excited to have our beautiful little girl.

When Bella was around three months old, we were invited to attend genetics counselling. When I look back, we were so naive and innocent and actually right in the centre of total chaos. The doctor asked how our new baby was, did we think she was developing typically and did she have any dysmorphic features? Time just stood still. I can recall every prickle of fear as if I were in the room now. We honestly never considered for a moment that Freddie’s needs could be hereditary and we also didn’t know there was such as thing as De Novo Genetic changes that occur. No-one had ever spoken of this other than the more well known syndromes they tested for regularly. What a shock that was.

We went onto the DDD (Decipering Developmental Disorders) study and waited.

During this time, I never threw away any of their baby things. Hoarded everything. We were only having two so what was I thinking? I called the geneticist a number of times hoping the results would be round the corner. Nothing.

Our main concern was finding an answer to enable us to give Bella all the information she would need for when her time comes to be a mum. If that is the path she chooses.

We also wanted (and didn’t want) to know if Freddie’s condition was life limiting.

As Bella was approaching eighteen months, I realised she needed back up. I don’t have any brothers or sisters and as I’ve experienced more of life’s riches and heartbreaks, it would have been good to have that back up. So grateful I have Ollie.

We needed safety in numbers.

I didn’t want Bella to feel pressure when she is older, perhaps when Ollie and I are no longer here. It’s tough managing these challenges alone. Although risky, without a diagnosis, we weighed up all the options and all the solutions open to us. After a lot of discussion, we decided to go ahead and try for a third baby. Freddie’s rare diagnosis of TUBA 1A came after Jago was born.

I’m not really sure how Jago will take it if he realises he was back up? I’m hoping he will know he was born from a deep place of love for our whole family unit. He has made us complete and we adore every inch of him as we do Bella and Freddie. We are extremely lucky to have three children. I hope they remain close as they grow, lean into each other and realise they now have safety in numbers.

AS PUBLISHED AT: AIMEEMANNMENTORING.COM

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